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Gunpowder, Treason and Plot

St Michael's Church, Stanwix
13 November 2010

Under their conductor Mark Hindley the choir presented a programme entitled Gunpowder, Treason and Plot, exploring English music written during the 16th and early 17th centuries by composers who found themselves on different sides of the religious and political divide and whose faith, experience and allegiance shaped their work.

Two anthems celebrated the failure of the Gunpowder Plot, while another set words by a convicted conspirator of the Babington plot written before his execution.

There is perhaps a danger that 16th century polyphony can sound abstract or polite. The response of choir and conductor here was robust and committed. They touched the feeling underlying the music whether it was the certain affirmation of hope in William Byrd's Quomodo Cantabimus, the prayerful serenity of Robert Parsons' Ave Maria (could this have been addressed to Mary Queen of Scots as well as the Virgin?) or the passionate supplication to the Virgin of the exiled Catholic Peter Philips in his Salve Regina. We felt the sorrow of Michael East's When David Heard, a biblical text adopted in response to the death of Henry Prince of Wales in 1612.

By way of contrast to the refined vocal sound (assisted perhaps by the interesting placement of singers not in groups according to voice range, but intermingled) we were fortunate to hear the distinguished cellist Emma Ferrand in interludes of solo music from later periods, including part of Bach's Second Suite. Here she drew us in to precious moments of intimate stillness. It was refreshing and unusual to hear Domenico Gabrielli's flowing Ricercar written 30 years before the Bach suite.

An illuminating, rewarding and affecting concert.

Laurence Jay