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Baltic Amber

St Andrew's Church, Penrith
4 February 2012

In the fifteen years since their formation The Wordsworth Singers have established a considerable reputation as a chamber choir, both in the quality of their performances and in the imaginative content of their programmes.

"Baltic Amber", presented in St. Andrew’s Church, Penrith on an evening of appropriately Baltic winter temperature, showed ample evidence of both. The music chosen represented each of the nine states which have a coastline on the Baltic Sea. As well as giving a flavour of the music of each of these countries, it gave the audience a chance to savour music of different periods from the rich 17th century polyphony of Buxtehude’s beautifully phrased Missa
Brevis to the sumptuous harmonies and novel effects of Erik Esenvalds’ Long Road, written as recently as 2010.

The opening piece, Glinka’s Cherubic Hymn with its mystical opening, adventurous chromatic writing and joyful Alleluia was followed by Arvo Pärt’s Magnificat, in which the composer uses endlessly ingenious combinations of voices and dissonances around a central held note to create some innovative and unique sounds. The choir, under the skilled direction of Mark Hindley, showed excellent control of phrasing, tuning and dynamics throughout this deeply felt and intensely personal work.

Both Kristina Vasiliauskaite’s Jeremiah Song and Hugo Alfvén’s The Evening offered mesmerising and lush harmonies while Einojuhani Rautavaara’s Departure offered an intriguing background sound of horse’s hooves from men and women’s voices in turn.

Undoubtedly one of the highlights of the evening was the final work, Henryk Gorecki’s Totus Tuus, the resplendent chordal opening and the ensuing spacious harmonies leading to a prayerful ending, in which the gradually subsiding dynamics were controlled with the utmost sensitivity.

Russian piano music by Borodin, Glinka and Tchaikovsky, played by Sam Hutchings, made an effective contribution
to an evening in which The Wordsworth Singers' reputation as an outstanding chamber choir was stylishly maintained.

Colin Marston