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Baltic Amber

Victoria Hall, Grange-over-Sands
5 February 2012

The task of putting together a programme which has a strong theme and plenty of variety requires skill and imagination and the Wordsworth Singers' concert conducted by Mark Hindley at the Victoria Hall, Grange-over-Sands, was an exceptional achievement in this respect. "Baltic Amber" was the evocatively titled programme which contained music by composers from the Baltic States.

The concert opened with the Cherubic Hymn by Glinka and the wonderfully sustained sonorous chords at the outset and lively and radiant final Alleluias showed that this choir, which I have known for many years, has never been on better form. Arvo Pärt’s Magnificat maintained this excellent standard – here special mention must be made of Fiona Weakley’s clear and confident sustained notes, which did much to ensure security of pitch in spite of a couple of small tuning lapses within the choir.

Buxtehude's Missa Brevis took us back to the 17th century and here the singers showed precision, rhythmic energy as well as lively elegance. The beautifully controlled ending was particularly impressive.

Kristina Vasiliauskaite’s Jeremiah Song brought us back to the 21st century and the singers revelled in its approachable harmonic style and rich textures. The first half closed with Hugo Alfvén’s Aftonen (Evening) and the lush harmonies evoked a calm evening sunset with the chorus humming being particularly effective.

The second half continued to delight with more controlled and expressive singing. Three motets by Peter Lange-Müller were notable for their elegant dance-like rhythms and some diligent work had been done on Danish pronunciation. For me the highlight was Long Road by Eriks Esenvalds; here, there were rich, beautifully tuned harmonies and most effective juxtaposition of main chorus and semichorus. The addition of pipes and gentle bells in the final bars was absolutely magical.

The concert ended with Górecki’s Totus Tuus, written for the third return visit of Pope John Paul II to his native Poland in 1987. This was an impassioned performance with the singers coping effortlessly with the long sustained passages and challenging key-changes.

It was an inspired idea to involve the pianist Sam Hutchings and his well chosen Russian pieces provided an effective contrast in each half of the concert.

We departed feeling very happy that we had braved the snowy conditions to enjoy what was one of the best choral concerts heard in this area for a very long time.

Hugh Davies