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Song of Songs

St John's Church, Keswick
23 June 2012

The Wordsworth Singers' concert given last Saturday in St John's Church Keswick took as its theme choral music inspired by the exuberant text of the "Song of Solomon" in the Old Testament. Mark Hindley, Director of Music, doesn’t shy away from challenging his singers and introducing them to both demanding and unfamiliar repertoire. I felt they were particularly successful with the later works which required a more homogenous sound and less equality across the vocal parts. The contemporary composer Howard Skempton's four movement Rise up my love relies almost totally on constantly shifting sensuous harmonies. The first movement was absolutely beautiful with perfectly controlled singing, excellent diction and clarity. The second movement is written for men’s voices only and demonstrated the richness and depth of singing in the bass section. The third movement My beloved is gone down for sopranos and altos was a vehicle for the excellent singing of this very proficient group whilst the final movement How fair and how pleasant was absolutely ravishing.

For me the high points of the concert were the two settings from Lieder der Liebe by the Swiss composer Carl Rütti written in 1993, which were accompanied by the cellist Emma Ferrand. These works both demand a choir of the highest standard and the Wordsworth Singers were not found wanting. There was considerable textural interest, with contrasting sections from men's and ladies' voices, considerable chromaticism and a cello part which started with harmonic glissandi before becoming more melodic. The second of the Rütti songs Behold begins most effectively first with the cello, then choral speaking before the choir vibrantly takes up the cello's melody and the composer uses the word "leaping" from the text to drive the music exuberantly forward. The singing was energetic, vigorous and rhythmical and Fiona Weakley's soprano solo soared above all this making the whole piece dramatic, inspiring and uplifting.

The Wordsworth Singers' concerts certainly give value for money and space does not allow me to mention the other works by Guerrero, Morales, Grieg, Cipriano de Rore, Monteverdi, Tomkins, Schütz and Walton which were, in the main, successfully performed. In addition to all this we were treated to three solo cello pieces played beautifully by the international instrumentalist Emma Ferrand: four movements from Bach's first solo suite for cello, Hamabdil by Bantock and, in his anniversary year, Delius's Romance – both these works being accompanied by Mark Hindley on the piano.

Yet another truly memorable concert by the Wordsworth Singers bringing unfamiliar works to both the performers and listeners.

John Cooper Green