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Celestial Banquet

St Patrick's Church, Patterdale
29 September 2012

The Wordsworth Singers, conducted by Mark Hindley, presented an intriguing programme at Patterdale on Saturday 29th September, of choral settings of texts for the feast of Corpus Christi.

Unlike most high days in the Church's calendar, the origins of Corpus Christi ('the Body of Christ') are not lost in antiquity; in fact it was invented by papal decree in the thirteenth century, with hymns, in celebration of the doctrine of transubstantiation, written by St Thomas Aquinas; and it was settings of these hymns that we heard here. Now it might be thought that an hour and a quarter of some notoriously thorny theology by mediaeval Christendom's greatest intellect might make for rather dry fare. Not a bit of it: we were treated to a rich and varied feast.

Aquinas' celebration of the institution of the Eucharist, removed from its austere origins in Holy Week, is by turns triumphant and meditative, and the singers were in fine voice to do justice to it all, from glorious Renaissance music for double choir by Victoria, Palestrina and Hassler to the concentrated radiance of modern French settings by Messiaen and Villette. The fervency of the opening and the closing Alleluias of Morales' O sacrum convivium framed some beautifully poised quiet singing, especially from the sopranos; Bruckner's Pange lingua was accorded unusually full dynamic contrast to thrilling, almost symphonic effect. The choir's superb attention to the words was audible throughout, never more so than in Anthony Pitts' Adoro te, the only English setting (alas that there was no space or time for Finzi's Lo, the full final sacrifice); they seemed as undaunted by the exposed passages of the 15th-century style of Johannes Regis as by the dense harmonies of the late 20th-century Pierre Villette.

The choir has recorded the programme and by this showing the forthcoming CD should be a joy. "Lovely!" muttered the chap in the audience behind me at the end of Willaert's radiant, sustained O salutaris, written for St Mark's in Venice. And so it was.

Henry Howard